Hi, I'm Brad Causey. Apertauga, which means "a window that opens," is a collection of my photographic work. In simplest terms, apertauga describes a camera's function; metaphorically, the “window” is the photo that can open eyes to new sights, open minds to new ways of thinking, and spark imagination.

 

My work is predominantly color abstract and minimalist, a study in composition and the relationships between forms and colors. The subjects and locations are generally indeterminable. Rather than depict a knowable reality, the images are an examination of the constituent parts of reality, like large microscope slides of samples collected from the field by a visual anthropologist.

 

In recent years, I've also begun shooting more nature and landscape photography. Most of these images are taken from the long roadways that stretch across the Midwest and portray a lonely, desolate landscape of abandoned spaces and places.

 

Among this recent work is also a series of trees in isolation, photographed with a similar compositional framing, that collectively comprise a field guide of sorts, or a Becher-esque typology. The German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher remain a strong influence on my work, and this series is dedicated to their extensive typologies of industrial architecture (though my focus is the organic subject matter of trees, rather than man-made structures).

 

Another subset of the apertauga collection consists of urban snapshots taken around Chicago and other cities. In contrast to the nature and landscape imagery, this series is much less deliberate in composition, preferring a from-the-hip, tourist’s style of photography meant to evoke the pace of life, disorientation, and the occasional sense of claustrophobia that a rural dweller may feel in the heart of a city.

 

Essentially, apertauga is serial photography—while each image has its own individual identity and merit, when viewed as part of a larger series or installation, there is a synergistic amplification that more closely conveys what the work is about. By combining groups of images around common elements—colors, forms, and so forth—new relationships are created, and that’s where things get really interesting. My motivation is to explore these relationships and expand the visual narrative. Each new image redefines the others and the way they relate to one another. This absolutely fascinates me. It’s a bit like finding puzzle pieces in random places for a bigger picture that you’ve never seen but are slowly revealing one piece at a time.

 

If you’d like to comment on the work or just say hello, my email is apertauga@gmail.com.

Thanks for stopping by!